Favorites/Popular

I decided to pull together a list of some of the most popular and favorite articles. Also included is a list of most asked questions with links to the answers. This page is the result.

Enjoy!

Originally posted December 12, 2016. Update Feb. 23, 2017.

Some of my most popular articles are grouped into these photography series.

The Exposure Series

“How To” Series: Winter Photography

“How To” Series: Snowy Owl Photography

“How To” Series: Off-Camera Flash

“How To” Series: Using GPS in Photography

“How To” Series: Astrophotography with the iOptron SkyTracker

“How To” Series: Photoshop’s Color Tools and Systems

The Buyer’s Guide Series – Your guide to the best of all things photographic. There are over 60 articles in this series, making it one of the most comprehensive buyer’s guides on the Internet.

Buyer’s Guide Series: Recommendations For The Best Photography Equipment, Software, Books, Magazines, DVDs, Online Photo Labs and More

Some of My Most Popular and Favorite Articles

How to Be A Better Wildlife and Nature Photographer

Colorado Fall Color Travel Guide

Finding the Peak Fall Color at the Best Locations

The Best Colors Come From the Best Exposures

How to Use Your Camera’s Exposure Compensation Scale

How To Get Critical Focus in “Live View” Mode with a Magnified Image

Using the Histogram to Check Studio Flash Exposures

How to Photograph the Northern Lights

How To Focus Your Lens on Infinity for Night Photography

How To Test Your Camera’s Color Exposure Latitude

Why Exposure is So Important

Exposure Warning: Turn On The Blinkies

Your Camera Does NOT Capture Reality! (And what to do about it.)

Your Camera Loves “Middle Gray” – And Why That is Important

ACR and RAW: Two of the Best Things You Can Do For Your Images

How to Save A Sun Flared Image with ACR and a Soft Light Brush

Setting a Custom White Balance Will Save You a Lot of Time

Better Images: Adobe’s Improved “Process Version” for Adobe Camera Raw

RGB vs Luminance Histogram

What to Do When A Lens Quits Working

Getting Started with High Dynamic Range (HDR) Photography

Giving Yourself Options: HDR Photography

Colors Your Eyes Can’t See – But Your Camera Can

Keep a Photo Trip Log

Articles that Can Save You Time and Money

Never Use Compressed (Canned) Air to Clean Your Camera - This article could save you $150 – $200.

Protect Your Camera Gear in the Cold and Snow – One simple mistake can ruin your camera and make it unrepairable.

The 3-2-1 Photo Backup Plan - If your hard drive crashes with all your precious photos and you don’t have a backup, it could easily cost $1,000 or more to get them restored by a reliable company. An unreliable company could cost you just as much or more and lose all your photos forever.

Don’t Click on That “Urgent Firefox Update” Notice! – This article could save you hours of time cleaning up a computer malware mess.

Don’t get ripped off!

Don’t get ripped off! Part Two

Frequently Asked Questions – These articles grew out of questions I am asked most often at my workshops and in emails. Each question is linked to the article with the answer.

How do I become a better wildlife and nature photographer?

What is the best way to photograph Christmas lights?

My hard drive crashed. What data-recovery service do you recommend?

What do I do if I lose the photos on my memory card?

How do I use my memory cards to minimize the chances of losing photos?

What are your favorite photo labs?

What Is a Cropped Sensor Camera and What Difference Does it Make?

Why is Adobe Camera Raw so important to get the best quality images? Be sure to check out the links at the end of the article.

How do I create panoramic images using the recent versions of Adobe Camera Raw?

What are the “blinkies” and why should I use them on my camera?

How do I get started with HDR (high dynamic range) photography?

Why shouldn’t I use refilled print cartridges?

How long will my photo lab prints last? Is there really that much difference from one lab to the next?

How do I copyright my photos?

Why is “middle gray” such a big deal for my camera meter and what should I do about it?

How do I meter manual flash units if I don’t have an incident flash meter?